Toyota Highlander Research & Reviews

Overview & Reviews

Average Score

4.56/5 Average
1,939 Total Reviews
Model Overview:

A pioneering vehicle in many ways, the Toyota Highlander was one of the first midsize crossover SUVs to be sold in America when it debuted in 2001. With its car-based unibody design, the original Highlander provided many benefits over Toyota's more traditional SUVs, including better handling, higher fuel mileage, a quieter cabin, improved crashworthiness and easier entry and exit for passengers.

Since then, the Toyota Highlander has gone on to become one of the most popular crossovers available, appealing to shoppers who want a vehicle with SUV styling, plenty of versatility for hauling cargo and a third-row seat. The third-generation Highlander has the most seating capacity, while the second generation has the most rear cargo space. That said, a Highlander of any vintage is one of the better values out there for those seeking a comfortable, easy-to-drive vehicle that can carry a fair amount of cargo and passengers and handle snow and ice during the winter months while still delivering decent fuel economy.

Current Toyota Highlander
Redesigned for 2014, the current Toyota Highlander is a few inches longer than the previous-generation model and sports notably more aggressive styling. The cabin has also been modernized: Many of the cabin's previously hard plastic surfaces are now covered with softer materials, and the electronics are more up to date.

The Highlander is available with front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive. Base front-drive models come with a 2.7-liter four-cylinder engine making 185 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. All other Highlanders have an impressively efficient 3.5-liter V6 good for 270 hp and 248 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard with either engine. There is also a Toyota Highlander Hybrid that delivers considerably better fuel economy. It is covered in a separate review.

Toyota Highlander shoppers can choose among four trim levels: LE, LE Plus, XLE and Limited. Highlights of the base LE include 18-inch wheels, a touchscreen display, a rearview camera, Bluetooth and an iPod/USB interface. Moving up to the LE Plus gets you a flip-up rear window, a power liftgate, a power driver seat and tri-zone climate control. The XLE's perks include keyless ignition and entry, a sunroof, leather upholstery, a navigation system and Toyota's Entune suite of smartphone app-based services. The top-dog Limited sports 19-inch wheels, upgraded leather upholstery, heated and ventilated front seats, second-row captain's chairs, ambient interior lighting and an upgraded audio system. Additional safety features like blind-spot monitoring, frontal collision warning/mitigation and lane-departure warning systems are also available on the Limited.

On the road, the Highlander's near-silent V6 engine is complemented by a liquid-smooth six-speed automatic transmission with the refinement you might expect in a Lexus. Acceleration is among the best in this class. Unless your budget will only allow the four-cylinder engine, the V6 is the way to go. Maximum passenger capacity is eight -- more than most other crossovers. The third-row seat is still really only suitable for children, but the second row slides and reclines, maximizing comfort. The interior looks and feels upscale and there are plenty of storage areas for your personal items. Overall, we highly recommend the Highlander if you're shopping for a large, three-row crossover SUV.

Used Toyota Highlander Models
The second-generation Toyota Highlander was produced from 2008-'13. It was significantly larger than the previous model in nearly every way, adding shoulder room, hiproom and legroom all around as well as additional cargo capacity.

This generation Highlander felt spry on the road and was easy to drive, with especially brisk acceleration coming from the V6 engine. We liked the quiet, roomy cabin that seated up to seven passengers. While the Highlander's third row was less spacious than those of some rivals, it was easy to reach thanks to a nifty 40/20/40-split second row with a removable center seat that facilitated walk-through access. Cargo space was also down compared to larger crossovers, but this Highlander should still be roomy enough for almost any family.

For 2008, the only available engine was a 270-hp 3.5-liter V6. In 2009 it was joined by a 2.7-liter four-cylinder engine that made 187 hp and 186 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission and front-wheel drive were standard, and all-wheel drive was available with the V6.

Available trim levels, depending on the year, were base, Sport, SE, Plus and Limited. Standard equipment on the base Highlander included air-conditioning, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel and the 40/20/40-split second row bench seat. The Sport trim level (2008-'10) added a more firmly tuned suspension, a rearview camera, a flip-up rear window in the liftgate and a power-adjustable driver seat.

For 2011, Toyota discontinued the Sport trim level and made most of that trim level's equipment standard on the SE (2010-'13). The SE also had a sunroof, heated seats, leather upholstery and an upgraded audio system. The Plus (2013 only) had similar equipment to the Sport. For the Limited, Toyota added 19-inch wheels, tri-zone automatic climate control, upgraded upholstery and a front passenger seat. Major options for this Highlander included a navigation system and a rear-seat entertainment system.

If you're shopping for a second-generation model, take note that the 2008 through 2010 models had a less versatile third-row seat with a one-piece bench design rather than the 2010-'13 model's 50/50-split seat. For 2011, Toyota also mildly updated the Highlander's exterior styling.

The first-generation Toyota Highlander was produced from 2001-'07. It was powered by either a 155-hp four-cylinder engine or a 220-hp 3.0-liter V6. A four-speed automatic transmission was standard. In 2004 the V6 was bumped up to 3.3 liters and 230 hp, and models so equipped received a five-speed automatic transmission, while four-cylinder models soldiered on with the four-speed unit (and 5 extra hp). Available trim levels were base, Sport and Limited.

Base models came equipped with a respectable amount of equipment, including air-conditioning, power accessories, cruise control and a CD player. The Sport trim spiced things up with 17-inch alloys, a sport-tuned suspension, foglights, a power driver seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shifter. The Limited added heated outside mirrors, power front seats, a fold-flat third-row seat (as of 2004) and an upgraded JBL sound system. Popular options included leather seating, an in-dash CD changer, a towing package and -- on the Limited model only -- a navigation system.

Shoppers interested in a used Toyota Highlander might want to confine their search to 2004 models and newer, not just because of the power increase, but also because a third-row seat and rear DVD entertainment system were newly available, enabling the Highlander to remain competitive with the strengthening crop of midsize crossover SUVs. Other significant changes for '04 included the addition of stability control and a tire-pressure warning system as standard equipment, as well as newly optional side curtain airbags for the first and second rows (which became standard on '07 models).

User Reviews:

Showing 1 through 10 of 1,939.00
  • two year owner - 2004 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    we have enjoyed our 2001 Highlander for almost 50,000 miles ,other than the gas miliage it has been a enjoyable experance.

  • Not as rugged as I had hoped for - 2014 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    This car is quite pricey. I wouldn't have even thought about buying it if I hadn't gotten 20K trade-in for my Tacoma. For the price, the quality is not that great. The shiny, cheap looking wheels disintegrate if you brush a curb and it costs $600+ to replace each one (not including labor). There are tiny spots missing paint from a bad paint job on the assembly line. Both front windows make a terrible loud screeching sound when you put them up and they hit the frame. And lastly, if you make chrome roof rails, why would the only option for roof rail bars be in cheap looking black plastic?

  • Love My Highlander - 2004 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    The Highlander drives like a car, gets fairly good gas milage. I love the easy loading and unloading of grocery, etc. I thought I wanted a SUV for my next new car. I checked out the Jeep, Chevrolet, Honda, Ford SUV's. Loved the style, ease of driving the Highlander. I added running boards, as I am short. I just love it, it is fun to drive and couldn't be more pleased.

  • Bigger is Better - 2008 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    I had an 05 Rav 4 which was a great little SUV, but the 08 Highlander that I've had for 3 weeks now is a lot more fun and a lot less cramped. Very quiet on the highway, quick to accelerate and a very comfortable interior. Took some getting used to with the bigger front. Love the radio with the 'sound adjustment' feature. When the road gets loud, the radio goes up!

  • Love it - 2008 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    Toyota had it all with new style, kids love it (16, 14, and 9 years old), very Lexus feeling. Not perfect but does really well across the board, will hold its value.

  • Nikki's Review - 2003 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    I really enjoy owning my highlander. It's everything it suppose to be in an SUV and more. The gas mileage is decent for a 4 cylinder. I average 24 mpg. I expect to get better gas mileage when I get closer to 20,000 miles.

  • Review of first 6 months..... - 2014 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    Ordered a to-be-built 2014 Limited in late February, 2014 and took delivery 3 weeks later. Alumina Jade Metallic (green) over tan/almond leather interior. Came from a 1997 Camry LE (186k miles) and a 2003 Honda Pilot (177k miles). I had been long researching the former Highland and current Honda Pilot. The Pilot is too boxy and I grew tired of all the hard plastics (though they do keep well with kids)> The former Highlander IMO was a little to soft for me in interior design. Let me just say that I absolutely love this vehicle.

  • Most Practical SUV You Can Cuy. - 2009 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    Toyota has proven that they put a lot of thought into their design with every cubic inch of the inside being carefully thought out. Seat comfort is great, leg room is never an issue, even for a 5'8" adult in the 3rd row. 2nd row recline is much easier to operate than the competitors. The car handles exceptionally, even with 19" wheels in 6 to 8" of snow, with the snow button on it is hard to make the car lose control. Hands free controls and individual climate controls are a plus. I am convinced for the money and the quality of this vehicle, you won't find a better car. From it's lower priced "rivals" from Kia & GM to overpriced imports such as Acura and Lexus, the Highlander is IT!

  • Great SUV - 2006 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    Our Toyota Highlander is the best vehicle we's ever owned. It's comfortable, gets good gas mileage and can haul heavy loads of gifts for our grandchildren. It seats seven and we love it.

  • poor tires on awd - 2008 Toyota Highlander
    By -

    Why buy an awd. The tires that come for it are junk. Only two mfg make them. The tires are very poor in the snow. See tire rack survey. Toyota told me to install chains. Why did I pay for the awd. Toyota blew it when it specked these tires. They should have gone to a size where there are more tires avail.

Toyota Highlander Reviews By Year:
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